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Healing families, Strengthening Communities

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Serving Our Communities

Two Feathers-NAFS provides services to all eligible Native American families in Humboldt County; not just those who are members of Tribal nations. We aim to serve those most in need with a strong focus on children and adolescents and violence prevention programming. While using Two Feathers services, community members have access to a range of cultural activities, resources, and programs within the Humboldt County Native American communities. In addition, our staff tailor our interventions and programs based on each child and family’s needs and interests.

A History of Service

Two Feathers NAFS was established in 1998 as a consortium of several Tribes to provide direct social services as guided by its mission at the time:

Two Feathers' mission is to promote the stability and security of Native families, and to protect the best interest of Indian children. We are committed to incorporating cultural traditions and principles that encourage a balance of emotional, mental, physical, and spiritual health. We are dedicated to collaborating with both Indian and non-Indian agencies to achieve these goals and to honor the privacy of Indian families.

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Two Feathers Today

Two Feathers-NAFS became a Tribal non-profit chartered under the federally recognized Big Lagoon Rancheria in 2002. Currently, Two Feathers has 10 paid staff, including Clinicians, a Project Manager, Family and Youth Advocates, Executive Director, Cultural Coordinators and an Administrative Assistant. Two Feathers also pays consultants for a variety of services: cultural programming, bookkeeping, IT and evaluation.

Since 2018, under the new leadership of Blair Kreuzer, Two Feathers is establishing itself as an innovation leader in the provisions of Native American based mental health and child welfare services through a comprehensive continuum of school, community-based and family focused treatment services for children and families experiencing high levels of trauma and oppression, and who are at risk for family disruption or institutional care for the children